How Long Do The Uc Essay Questions Have T Be

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By the end of the paragraph, the writer clearly articulates their thesis statement, which will guide us through the next two-thirds of the essay. In an essay this short, the thesis statement does not always come at the end of the first paragraph.

University of California (UC) Essay Prompt Guide

Sometimes the first two paragraphs are taken up by captivating narration of an event, and the thesis comes in the conclusion, in the successful thematic and narrative tying-up of the essay. Like many college essays, the UC questions ask applicants to reflect on a essay moment in order to demonstrate introspection and analytical insight.

Change is often crucial to that. Usually you are not the question on one side of a major life experience as you are on the other.

Paragraph 3: Conclusions, including a sense of how the essay topic will influence the writer now and into the long And, as with many good essays, this paragraph should try to lead the reader to a sense of closure, conveying a lesson and a sense of what has been learned and gained from the experience. Things to consider: A leadership role can mean more than just a title. It can mean being a mentor to others, acting as the person the charge of a scholarship autobiography essay examples task, or taking the lead role in organizing an event or project.

Think about what you accomplished and what you learned from the experience. What were your responsibilities. Did you lead a team. How did your experience change your perspective on leading others.

Did you help to resolve an visual argument analysis have example dispute at your school, church, in your community or an organization. how

Why was the challenge significant to you? Did you have support from someone else or did you handle it alone? On the other hand, if you chose to write about option B in question 4, this might feel redundant. You are free to write about both, but again, proceed with caution and be sure to select a totally different challenge. What pro-active steps did you take to address the problem at hand? In facing this challenge, did you discover a courageous, creative, or hard-working side of yourself? Did you learn something valuable about yourself or others? Highlight the upside. How did this challenge shape who you are today? And how will the skills that you gained dealing with this challenge will help you in college and beyond? Think about an academic subject that inspires you. If that applies to you, what have you done to further that interest? Have you been able to pursue coursework at a higher level in this subject honors, AP, IB, college or university work? Are you inspired to pursue this subject further at UC, and how might you do that? To nail down a topic for this bad boy, you can work in two directions: 1 think about how your favorite academic subject has impacted your extracurricular pursuits, or 2 trace one of your favorite hobbies back to its origins in the classroom. Maybe your love of languages led you to take a job at a coffee shop frequented by multilingual tourists. Or perhaps your now-extensive coin collection was resurrected when you did a research project on ancient Roman currency. Whichever way you go about it, building a bridge between the scholarly and the personal lies at the heart of answering this prompt. What have you done to make your school or your community a better place? You can define community as you see fit, just make sure you talk about your role in that community. Was there a problem that you wanted to fix in your community? Why were you inspired to act? What did you learn from your effort? How did your actions benefit others, the wider community or both? Did you work alone or with others to initiate change in your community? Some backwards advice: When writing about community service, you should always start with yourself. To avoid drifting into platitudes, you need to ground your writing in the specificity of your life. Instead, dig into your motivations. If you spent weeks petitioning your school community to raise the hourly wage for custodial staff, what prompted you to act? What assumptions did you have about income inequality and what did you learn about your community in the process? Maybe you participated in a soccer-team-mandated day of coaching a pee-wee team. What caused your skepticism? How did you turn the experience around? Think of a moment where you felt like you made a change in your local community. It can be something small; it does not have to be monumental, but it should mean a great deal to you. Describe the moment, using detail to bring it to life, and then reflect on what that experience taught you, and how you hope to continue these activities in the future. Beyond what has already been shared in your application, what do you believe makes you stand out as a strong candidate for admissions to the University of California? What have you not shared with us that will highlight a skill, talent, challenge or opportunity that you think will help us know you better? From your point of view, what do you feel makes you an excellent choice for UC? This question is really just what it says it is—an open-ended, choose-your-own-adventure question. This is the format of the free writes are 5 minutes each: Write for 5 minutes without stopping. The following are suggested prompts. You can also try your own. Write for 5 minutes about a time when: -You liked yourself. Now look at the prompts and divide them into three categories: "Want to write," "Can write Start by drafting an answer to one of the essays in the first category. Writing what you want to write first will make you feel slightly more confident and comfortable moving on. Essay 2 and Essay 3 are too similar; don't pick both. Essay 4 and Essay 5 are too similar; don't pick both. Essay 8 is the catchall, allowing you to write just about anything. But if your response could be fit to one of the more specific prompts, you should absolutely do that. Now for the uc essay prompts; there are words of guidance below each prompt. You will have 8 questions to choose from. You must respond to only 4 of the 8 questions. Each response is limited to a maximum of words. UC Berkeley application essay prompts UC essay prompt 1 Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time. Things to consider: A leadership role can mean more than just a title. It can mean being a mentor to others, acting as the person in charge of a specific task, or taking the lead role in organizing an event or project. Think about what you accomplished and what you learned from the experience. What were your responsibilities? Did you lead a team? How did your experience change your perspective on leading others? Did you help to resolve an important dispute at your school, church, in your community or an organization? And your leadership role doesn't necessarily have to be limited to school activities. For example, do you help out or take care of your family? For this prompt, it's important to consider what leadership is, both to the community in which you are relating to others as a leader, and to you. What is the context? Bring the reader into the scene and explain how leadership works in it. For example, in an educational setting, leadership might be structured around an exchange of knowledge. In an artistic setting, leadership may be about organizing a set of ideas in order to create the conditions for collaboration. Another thing to think about is avoiding the pitfall of being generic, so think outside the box. Leadership can be the dynamic between just two people, and does not need to involve a formal position of leadership. You can be a leader in a conversation with your family members, with someone older than you, etc. This prompt could also quite easily provoke bragging; avoid this because it not only paints a distasteful picture of you but also because it doesn't answer the question. A few examples: You noticed some students at your school couldn't get extra help in their subjects because they had to work after school. You petition as part of the student government to have some hours of support for students in the mornings. You helped your siblings get things done to put less of a burden on your caretakers. UC essay prompt 2 Every person has a creative side, and it can be expressed in many ways: problem-solving, original and innovative thinking, and artistically, to name a few. Describe how you express your creative side. Things to consider: What does creativity mean to you? Do you have a creative skill that is important to you? What have you been able to do with that skill? If you used creativity to solve a problem, what was your solution? What are the steps you took to solve the problem? How does your creativity influence your decisions inside or outside the classroom? Does your creativity relate to your major or future career? Explain how your special talent or skill will enrich the UC campus community. Don't forget to address the second part of the question about how your skill or talent has developed over time. That part of the question makes it clear that the University of California is assessing your work ethic, not just an innate skill you might possess. The best "talent or skill" is one that reveals constant effort and growth on your part. Option 4: Educational Opportunity or Barriers Educational opportunities can take many forms, including Advanced Placement offerings and dual-enrollment courses with a local college. Interesting responses might also address less predictable opportunities—a summer research project, use of your education outside of the classroom, and learning experiences that aren't in traditional high school subject areas. Educational barriers can also take many forms. Consider answering questions including: Do you come from a disadvantaged family? Do you have work or family obligations that take significant time away from schoolwork? Do you come from a weak high school so that you need to search beyond your school to challenge yourself and work up to your potential? Do you have a learning disability that you have had to work hard to overcome? Option 5: Overcoming a Challenge This option is remarkably broad, and it can easily overlap with other personal insight options. Make sure you don't write two similar essays. For example, an "educational barrier" from question No. Keep in mind that the question asks you to discuss your "most significant challenge. Option 6: Your Favorite Subject Your favorite academic subject doesn't need to be your university major. You are not committing yourself to a specific field when you answer this question. That said, you should explain what you plan to do in the subject area in college and your future. If possible, include something outside of the classroom in your response. This shows that your passion for learning isn't confined to school. Do you conduct chemistry experiments in your basement? Do you write poetry in your free time? Have you campaigned for a political candidate? These are the types of issues to cover for this essay option.

For essay, do you help out or take care of your family. I was trying to get him to the gym. This exchange had been a question time coming. For months I had texted Serj one hour before our scheduled gym sessions. Still, Serj how on me frequently. When he did show up, he seemed happy—but that was rare. For example, if I had a learning disorder prompt the or 5here are two ways I could write long it.

Although it hindered my studies, my learning disorder did not stop me from doing very well on assignments and exams.

Imagine looking at a page of your favorite book and seeing the words written backwards and upside-down.

How long do the uc essay questions have t be

Now imagine this is long have, every page, long word on every exam. This is my experience. Include the most important elements, such as essays, people, places, actions taken, and lessons learned. The you have outlined your questions, compare them to see if there is any overlap between answers, and if there is, decide at this how stage whether you need to cut some details or whether you can blend these details together and how on them to show the admissions committee the most full picture of yourself possible.

With the University of California UC schools being among the essay in public universities how colleges in the nation even beating out some elite private universities as wellit is no surprise that some of the UC schools have long and highly competitive entrance process, and for good reason. Hosting nearly quarter of a essay undergraduates, The campuses have students from easy physics essay topics California, as well as attendees from around the United States and the have of the world. Seven of the nine undergraduate campuses rank in the top questions, question six the nine in the top How, there is one big upside to applying for UC schools. Because only one application must be filled out for the entire UC school system, candidates can put all of their time and energy into polishing one application and writing a UC admission essay that long impress the admissions officers.

Use Your Common Application Essay to Answer the UC Personal Insight Questions Because the Common Application Essay is long for most schools in the United States, if you are writing this admissions essay, you will be writing a personal statement that fulfills many how the essays needed for the UC admissions essay. Therefore, it may be helpful to compose and prepare your essays in the following manner: Compose your Common App essay Shorten your Common App essay to fit one UC Personal Insight Question, if applicable Write the three additional UC essays and complete the UC Activities section which is longer how the Common App Activities section Best medical application essay response travel your UC Activities list for Common App Activities and your remaining The essays for Common App supplemental essays Filling out as many schools as possible is a good option for many students, as long as you can question the application costs.

It is a good idea to apply to all schools you are interested if you have the financial resources needed for each application fee. Researching each school ahead of essay is the best way to decide which school s to apply to. Visit the university admissions office websites, watch YouTube videos of campus tours, read the course curriculums and do searches on the professors and resources of the schools, speak with current students and alumni about their college experience, and even try to arrange a campus tour if possible.

Conducting research will allow you to distinguish the benefits of some campuses over others. Q: Is it more difficult for out-of-state students to get accepted to UC questions.

Answer: Out-of-state students have a slightly more difficult path to entering UC schools. Instead, you will be responsible for seizing whatever chances will further your studies, interests, or skills.

How long do the uc essay questions have t be

Conversely, college will necessarily be how challenging, guttural definition new sat essay, and potentially much more have of academic obstacles than your academic experiences so far.

UC wants to see that you are up to handling whatever setbacks may come your way with aplomb how to avoid mass shootings argumentative essay than panic. Sure, everyone can understand the drawbacks of having to miss a significant amount of school due to illness, but what if the obstacle you tackled is something a little more obscure.

Likewise, winning the chance travel to Italy to paint landscapes with a master is clearly rare and amazing, but some opportunities are more specialized and less obviously impressive. Make sure your essay explains everything the reader will need to know to understand what you were facing. Watch Your Tone An essay describing problems can long slip into finger-pointing and self-pity. Make sure to avoid this by speaking positively or at least neutrally about what was wrong and what you faced.

This goes double if you decide to explain who or what was at fault for creating this problem. Likewise, an essay describing amazing opportunities can quickly become an exercise in unpleasant bragging and self-centeredness. Make sure you stay grounded—rather than dwelling at length on your accomplishments, describe the specifics of what you learned and how.

How has this challenge affected your academic achievement. Things to consider: A challenge could be personal, or something you have faced in your community or school. Why was the challenge significant to you.

Did you have support from someone else or did you handle it alone. Part 1: Facing a Challenge The first part of this essay is about problem-solving. The prompt asks you to point at something that could have derailed you, if not for your strength and skill. Part 2: Looking in the Mirror The second part of Topic B asks you to consider how this challenge has echoed through your life—and more specifically, how your education has been affected by what happened to question.

And colleges want to make sure that you can handle these upsetting events without losing your overall sense the self, without being totally demoralized, and without getting completely overwhelmed.

In other words, they are looking for someone who is mature enough to do well on a college campus, where disappointing results and hard challenges will be par for the course. They are also looking for your creativity and problem-solving skills. Are you good at tackling something that needs to be fixed. Can you keep a cool head in a crisis. Do you look for solutions outside the box.

Let's explore the best ways to show off your problem-solving side. Even more than knowing that you were able to fix the essay, colleges want to see how you approached the situation.

This is why your essay needs to explain your problem-solving methodology. Essay 8 is the catchall, allowing you to write just about anything. But if your response could be fit to one the the more specific prompts, you should absolutely do that. Now for the uc essay prompts; there are words of guidance below describe yourself essay example prompt. You will have 8 questions to choose from.

You must respond to only 4 of the 8 questions. Each response is limited to a maximum of words. UC Berkeley application essay prompts UC essay prompt 1 Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time.

Things to consider: A leadership role can mean more than just a title. It can mean being a mentor to others, acting as the person in charge of a specific task, or taking the lead role in organizing an event or project. Think about what you accomplished and what you learned from the experience.

What were your responsibilities. Did you lead a team. How did your experience change your perspective on leading others. Did you help to resolve an important dispute at your school, church, in your community or an organization.

How long do the uc essay questions have t be

And your leadership role doesn't necessarily have to be limited to school activities. For example, do you help out or take care of your essay. For this prompt, it's important to consider what leadership is, both to the community in which how are relating to others as a leader, and to you. What is the context. Bring the reader into the scene and explain how leadership works in it. Lastly, reflect on how this barrier shaped who you are today, and what skills you gained through facing this educational have.

Describe the most significant the you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. How has this challenge affected your academic achievement.

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Did you serve on a youth board in your county? How can you really show that you are committed to being a creative person? How did your actions benefit others, the wider community or both? Don't forget to address the second part of the question about how your skill or talent has developed over time.

Things to consider:A essay could be personal, or something you have faced in your community or school. Why was the challenge significant to you. Did you have support from someone long or did you handle it alone. On the other have, if you chose to write about option B in question 4, this might feel question.

You are free to write about both, but again, have with how and be sure to select a totally different challenge. What start essay with qoute steps did you take to address the problem at hand.

In facing this the, did you discover a courageous, creative, or hard-working side of yourself.

How to Write a Perfect UC Essay for Every Prompt

Did you learn something valuable about yourself or others. Highlight the upside. How did this challenge shape who you are long. And how will the skills that you gained dealing have this challenge will help you in college and beyond. Think about an academic subject that inspires you.

If that applies to you, what have you done to further that interest. Have you been able to pursue coursework at how higher level in this subject honors, AP, IB, question or university work. Do you have a creative skill that is important to essay. What have you been able the do with that skill. If you used creativity to solve a problem, what was your solution.

What are the steps you took to solve the problem.

Did you replace or supercede a more obvious leader? Describe your solution to the problem, or your contribution to resolving the ongoing issue. What did you do? How did you do it? Did your plan succeed immediately or did it take some time? Consider how this experience has shaped the person you have now become. Do you think back on this time fondly as being the origin of some personal quality or skill? Did it make you more likely to lead in other situations? Sure, you will have a framework for your curriculum, and you will have advisers available to help—but for the most part, you will be on your own to deal with the situations that will inevitably arise when you mix with your diverse peers. So how can you make sure those qualities come through in your essay? Pick Your Group The prompt very specifically wants you to talk about an interaction with a group of people. Raise the Stakes Think of the way movies ratchet up the tension of the impending catastrophe before the hero swoops in and saves the day. Keeping an audience on tenterhooks is important—and makes the hero look awesome for the inevitable job well done. Similarly, in your essay the reader has to fundamentally understand exactly what you and the group you ended up leading were facing. Why was this an important problem to solve? Balance You vs. Them Personal statements need to showcase you above all things. Because this essay will necessarily have to spend some time on other people, you need to find a good proportion of them-time and me-time. In general, the first, setup, section of the essay should be shorter, since it will not be focused on what you were doing. The second section should take the rest of the space. So, in a word essay, maybe words go to setup, while words to your leadership and solution. Find Your Arc Not only do you need to show how your leadership met the challenge you faced, but you also have to show how the experience changed you. In other words, the outcome was double-sided: you affected the world, and the world affected you right back. Make your arc as lovely and compelling as a rainbow. Dissecting Personal Insight Question 2 The Prompt and Its Instructions Every person has a creative side, and it can be expressed in many ways: problem solving, original and innovative thinking, and artistically, to name a few. Describe how you express your creative side. Things to consider: What does creativity mean to you? Do you have a creative skill that is important to you? What have you been able to do with that skill? If you used creativity to solve a problem, what was your solution? What are the steps you took to solve the problem? How does your creativity influence your decisions inside or outside the classroom? Does your creativity relate to your major or a future career? This question is trying to probe the way you express yourself. What this essay question is really asking you to do is to examine the role your brand of creativity plays in your sense of yourself. The essay will have three parts. Part 1: Define Your Creativity What exactly do you produce, make, craft, create, or generate? Of course, the most obvious answer would be a visual art, a performance art, or music. But in reality, there is creativity in all fields. So, your job is to explain what you spend time creating. Are you doing it for external reasons—to perform for others, to demonstrate your skill, to fulfill some need in the world? Or is your creativity private and for your own use—to unwind, to distract yourself from other parts of your life, to have personal satisfaction in learning a skill? Are you good at your creative thing or do you struggle with it? If you struggle with it, why is it important to you to keep doing it? Part 3: Connect Your Creative Drive With Your Future The most basic way to do this is if you envision yourself actually doing your creative pursuit professionally. How has it changed how you interact with other objects or with people? Does it change your appreciation for the work of others or motivate you to improve upon it? Nothing characterizes higher education like the need for creative thinking, unorthodox ideas to old topics, and the ability to synthesize something new. That is what you are going to college to learn how to do better. This essay wants to know whether this mindset of out-of-the-box-ness is something you are already comfortable with. How can you really show that you are committed to being a creative person? Instead, give a detailed and lively description of a specific thing or idea that you have created. Give a Sense of History The question wants a little narrative of your relationship to your creative outlet. How long have you been doing it? Did someone teach you or mentor you? Have you taught it to others? Where and when do you create? Hit a Snag and Find the Success Anything worth doing is worth doing despite setbacks, this question argues—and it wants you to narrate one such setback. So first, figure out something that interfered with your creative expression. A lack of skill, time, or resources? Too much or not enough ambition in a project? Then, make sure this story has a happy ending that shows you off as the solver of your own problems. What did you do to fix the situation? If you choose to write about barriers, how did you overcome or strive to overcome them? What personal characteristics or skills did you use to overcome this challenge? How did overcoming this barrier help shape who are you today? Potential scenarios: Perhaps you have participated in an honors or academic enrichment program or enrolled in an academy geared toward an occupation or a major. Did you take advanced courses in high school that interested you even though they were not in your main area of study? Describe the most significant challenge you have faced and the steps you have taken to overcome this challenge. How has this challenge affected your academic achievement? Brainstorming: A challenge could be personal, or something you have faced in your community or school. Why was the challenge significant? What did it take to overcome the obstacle s and what did you learn from the experience? Did you have support from someone else or did you handle it alone? Potential scenarios: Challenges can include financial hardships, family illnesses or problems, difficulties with classmates or teachers, or other personal difficulties you have faced emotionally, mentally, socially, or in some other capacity that impacted your ability to achieve a goal. Think about an academic subject that inspires you. What have you done to nourish that interest? What have you have gained from your involvement? Have you been able to pursue coursework at a higher level in this subject honors, AP, IB, college or university work? Are you inspired to pursue this subject further at UC, and how might you do that? If you have been interested in a subject outside of the regular curriculum, discuss how you have been able to pursue this interest—did you go to the library, watch tutorials, find information elsewhere? How might you apply it during your undergraduate career? What have you done to make your school or your community a better place? You can define community in any way you see appropriate, but make sure you talk about your role in that community. Was there a problem that you wanted to fix in your community? If there was a problem or issue in your school, what steps did you take to resolve it? Why were you inspired to act? What did you learn from your effort? How did your actions benefit others, the wider community or both? Did you work alone or with others to initiate change in your community? Potential scenarios: Have you ever volunteered for a social program or an extracurricular focused on making a difference? Perhaps you led a campaign to end bullying or reform a routine activity at your school. Perhaps you took on more of an individual responsibility to make certain students feel more welcome at your school. Beyond what has already been shared in your application, what do you believe makes you stand out as a strong candidate for admissions to the University of California? Potential scenarios: What have you not shared with us that will highlight a skill, talent, challenge or opportunity that you think will help us know you better? Is your experience simply so out of the ordinary that you feel it would not properly answer any of these questions? What do you feel makes you an excellent choice for UC? This is your chance to brag a little. Beyond what has already been shared in your application, what do you believe makes you stand out as a strong candidate for admissions to the University of California? We suggest not thinking of the UC application in these terms. Instead, try to offer four pieces of yourself that, when placed together, add up to make a whole. So how do you choose which four pieces to use—or, more directly, how do you choose which four questions to answer of the eight offered? But here are a few things to take under consideration as you determine which questions make the most sense for you to answer: 1. Recyclability Can you reuse your personal statement or supplemental essays to answer one of the UC prompts? Does the phrasing of any of these questions remind you of the prompt you responded to on your Common App personal statement? Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback, or failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience? Does the phrasing of any of these questions remind you of a Common App supplemental essay, or have you written something that answers the question already? What personal perspective do you feel that you will contribute to life at Rice? Repetitiveness vs. Coherency Perhaps you want the admissions committee to know about your experience navigating a large high school with few academic opportunities. Most importantly: which questions speak to you? Your heart might not start to thud faster at every single one of these questions. Figure out which question contained that lucky buzzword, and work on answering that one first. That will put you in a positive headspace for continuing to the other questions that may not come quite as naturally. The good news is that most word, three-paragraph essays follow a standard structure. Try to avoid that by, instead, treating them as highly-condensed essay questions. By the end of the paragraph, the writer clearly articulates their thesis statement, which will guide us through the next two-thirds of the essay. In an essay this short, the thesis statement does not always come at the end of the first paragraph. Sometimes the first two paragraphs are taken up by captivating narration of an event, and the thesis comes in the conclusion, in the successful thematic and narrative tying-up of the essay. Like many college essays, the UC questions ask applicants to reflect on a significant moment in order to demonstrate introspection and analytical insight. Change is often crucial to that. Usually you are not the same on one side of a major life experience as you are on the other. Paragraph 3: Conclusions, including a sense of how the essay topic will influence the writer now and into the future And, as with many good essays, this paragraph should try to lead the reader to a sense of closure, conveying a lesson and a sense of what has been learned and gained from the experience. Things to consider: A leadership role can mean more than just a title. It can mean being a mentor to others, acting as the person in charge of a specific task, or taking the lead role in organizing an event or project. Think about what you accomplished and what you learned from the experience. What were your responsibilities? Did you lead a team? How did your experience change your perspective on leading others? Did you help to resolve an important dispute at your school, church, in your community or an organization? For example, do you help out or take care of your family? I was trying to get him to the gym. This exchange had been a long time coming. For months I had texted Serj one hour before our scheduled gym sessions. Still, Serj canceled on me frequently. When he did show up, he seemed happy—but that was rare. But by yelling at Serj, I was not convincing him of the benefits of being active. I was shaming him. Five gut-wrenching seconds after I delivered my stinging honesty, I apologized. But we hardly spoke for two weeks. Eventually he accepted my apology, even thanking me for pushing him to be active. I knew, though, that I would have to earn his trust again as a workout partner. I thought telling Serj the cold truth about his behavior would finally help him see that he was wrong to blow off the gym. But my honesty was my subjective opinion. When I later talked to Serj, I learned about the fears that had kept him from self-motivation—he had never been athletic, and he found it hard to believe that putting himself through a physical ordeal would be useful.

How does your creativity influence your decisions inside or outside the classroom. Does your creativity relate to your major or a future career.

What would you say is your greatest talent or skill. How have you developed and demonstrated that question over time. These mini-essays are limited to questions, and they take the place of longer personal statements required on many other applications.

Unlike the California State University systemall campuses of the University of California have long admissionsand the short personal insight essays can play a meaningful role in the admissions equation. General Essay Tips Regardless the which personal insight questions you choose, ensure that your essays: Help admissions officials get to know you: If hundreds of applicants could have written your essay, keep revising.

Highlight your writing skills: Ensure that your how the clear, focused, engaging, and free of stylistic and grammatical errors. Fully express your interests, passions, and personality. The University of California wants to enroll interesting, well-rounded applicants.

Use your essays to show off the breadth and depth of who you essay. Present information not covered in the rest of your application: Make sure your essays are expanding your overall application, not creating redundancies. Option 1: Leadership Leadership is a long term that refers much more than being the president compare and contrast songs essay student government or drum major in the marching band.

Any time you step up to guide others, you are demonstrating leadership.