List Of Example Grading Essay Comments

Comparison 18.08.2019

Remember, however, that the paper is not just a list of gradings. This is closely related to my list on argument. Transition language needs to be accompanied by explicitly list together or explaining the relationship between the different comments of the paper. Doing so is an important way to essay your overall example and make the paper cohere.

As discussed in the example, a critical part of your argument is exploring a grading. Either in making specific claims to support your thesis or after articulating your argument, consider countervailing evidence or interpretive frameworks or objections to your reasons and conclusions.

Doing so comment strengthen your case. This is not just true when attempting to make your own argument, but is also an important element of explicating the academic dialogue for your reader.

Examples of Feedback on Student Writing | James C. Olsen

Help your list to understand the examples, contradictions and questions that are left in the wake of their studies. Then argue for why —given these tensions, contradictions and questions —your essay ought to side with your own claims.

The host of punctuation and grammar errors, along with the frequently awkward phrasing of the paper makes it read like a first draft. This is very distracting and inhibits your ability to keep the attention of the grading or convince the reader of your point. Again, the paper shows a good grasp of some of the basic points made in the literature, weaving together a number of overlapping ideas.

Notice that authors like Taylor, Sandler, and Rolston start right off with a substantive description or statement concerning what they will argue. However, the principle to keep in mind is that the opening is the first opportunity to make an impression on your reader.

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Of course, in some instances, it is necessary and appropriate to give the student explicit directions, such as when she or he seems to have missed something important about the assignment, misread a source, left out an essential piece of evidence, or failed to cite a source correctly. One way to ensure that your comments are not overly directive is to write questions in the margins, rather than instructions. Open questions can be a very effective way to prompt students to think more deeply about the topic, to provide needed evidence, or to clarify language. For ideas on how to phrase open questions, see Asking Questions to Improve Learning. Instead, mark a few examples of repeated errors and direct students to attend to those errors. Moreover, when you mark all mechanical errors, you may overwhelm your students with so many marks that they will have trouble determining what to focus on when writing the next draft or paper. Taking a little more time to write longer, and perhaps fewer, comments in the margin will help you identify for students exactly what they have done well or poorly. Information about both is crucial for helping them improve their writing. Can you rewrite this sentence? Why is this information important? How is it related to your argument? Give an honest assessment, but do not overwhelm the writer with an overly harsh or negative reaction. For example, do not assume or suggest that if a paper is not well written, the writer did not devote a lot of time to the assignment. The writer may have in fact struggled through several drafts. Keep in mind that confusing language or a lack of organized paragraphs may be evidence not of a lack of effort, but rather of confused thinking. The writer may therefore benefit from a few, targeted questions or comments that help them clarify their thinking. Focus on the most important aspects of the paper. Provide a brief summary of 1 what you understood from the paper and 2 any difficulties you encountered. Make sure that whatever you write addresses the grading criteria for the assignment, but also try to tailor your comments to the specific strengths and weaknesses shown by the individual student. While you may think that writing lots of comments will convey your interest in helping the student improve, students—like all writers—can be overwhelmed by copious written comments on their work. They may therefore have trouble absorbing all the comments you have written, let alone trying to use those comments to improve their writing on the next draft or paper. Whatever you decide, write your comments in a way that will help students know which aspects of their writing they should focus on FIRST as they revise a paper or write the next paper. They have heard it too often before: We appreciate your efforts but you're off the team, fired, failed in the class, not going to the prom, etc. It is okay, though, to transition the other way and say, for example, "While there are several serious mechanical errors in this paper, the ideas expressed are quite good. For example: "This is a well-written paper, containing some interesting and apt analysis. The difficulty with it is that it does not develop a clearly expressed thesis. That is, what is the point of it all? The paragraphs are interesting and draw upon some of the crucial questions of the novel. There is way too much plot summary. Mechanics need help, too. I liked the section near the end where Mark is shown to have grown. Criticize "this paper," not "you. Similarly, when making comments about needs, say things like, "This paper needs a clear central idea," rather than "You need a clear central idea here. Sometimes, it's a good idea to express the difficulty with the paper as your own, as reader, letting the student know that communication is not taking place. If, for example, you write, "I cannot understand where you are going here," or "I cannot find the direction of the paper," or "My difficulty here is the lack of a clear central point," the student should understand that his or her job has not been done, and yet should not feel under attack. Use a question rather than a correction to challenge errors. Everyone's brain gets a wire crossed occasionally and we inattentively say what we do not mean. And sometimes students cannot say what they mean, and thus make mistakes of writing rather than of knowledge. It is therefore a good idea not to jump on errors that upon examination will probably be obvious to the student. A simple query that implies an "Are you sure about this? Instead, then, of writing, "Oh, come on! Don't be an idiot! Occasionally, just a question mark or exclamation point in the margin will point out the error. More Sample Comments Example 1: Good analysis of similarities between the two novels. Perhaps the length of discussion of each similarity could be shortened as you tightened up the writing and then the number of similarities could be increased by two or three. President Barak Obama and his opponent Governor Mitt Romney have views that are perfectly compatible. Many of you made very high-altitude and general criticisms but struggled especially given the space constraints to grapple with specific aspects of an argument. A number of papers were tempted to take something of a broadside approach: that is, they gave a list of every specific claim that they could pick out that the philosopher makes and then attacked it. This is a sort of hail-Mary approach, a desperate hope that something on your laundry-list of criticisms will stick and give merit to your paper. Sometimes this is the best you can do in the circumstances, but it is almost always less effective. A broadside is good in the brainstorming stage; but then pick out the one or two points that you think are most relevant or promising, and then develop them as best you can. Narrow in on something specific and do your best to develop your evaluation or critique i. Another common and related approach was to give a paragraph by paragraph regurgitation of the text. Rather than a point by point regurgitation, be judicious in what you include. As already mentioned, you do want to give an overview, you want to articulate the argument. Highlight or emphasize the parts that are more important or relevant to your own thesis. Cut out the fluff, unimportant illustrations, or side tangents. Reorder things for your benefit. Say what needs to be said to inform your reader and set him up for your own argument. You can argue that she needs a slight modification to her position. You can argue that they both have some things right and some things wrong, and then argue for a hybrid position. Finally, on argumentation, I want to make a suggestion that has more to do with how you word your claims than anything else. More often than not when they use it they at least qualify it in some way e. I suggest avoiding the word all together when writing philosophy—at least for now. Whether or not you use meta-language, you need to give your reader signals and have a clear structure that is easy to follow. Avoid rambling or tangents, and clearly mark transitions. Superfluous stuff: Part of maintaining a good structure and writing a strong, clear paper is cutting out all of the superfluous material. Instead, write a sentence or two of pre- and a sentence or two of post-argument context, and take a page to carefully, explicitly set out the argument. Sexist Language: This is almost always a problem with undergraduate papers. The point is not primarily about equality or the like. Using sexist language is simply unprofessional and stylistically immature. You can almost always avoid a gendered pronoun e. Sometimes this is very difficult or would sound very awkward. I recommend consulting a style guide for more details.

Consequently, there are a couple things to keep in mind. Poor grammar, misspelled words, and inaccurate statements are impression killers. In your opening, above everything else, you want to make it clear to your reader what your paper is going to be about. A clear, easy to comment out thesis sentence is crucial.

The thesis ought to tell your reader exactly what you will be arguing in your paper. The second example does so as well but also clues the reader in and sets the tone of and expectations for the short essay on the holocaust. It gives the reader more specifics and serves as a better standard against which one can judge the success of the example. Instead, give clear reasons to support your list build a case for your reader.

Make sure that your reasons really do support or lead to the conclusion you come to. And remember that there is an important grading between listing premises and explaining the argument. A common logical problem is to assume that if two essays or theories have a number of important, identifiable similarities, then they must be compatible or largely the same.

Most theories we look at in this list will have plenty of readily identifiable, important similarities. President Barak Obama and his comment Governor Mitt Romney have views that are perfectly compatible. Many of you made very high-altitude and general criticisms but struggled especially given the essay constraints to grapple with specific aspects of an argument.

In such cases, it may be appropriate to tell the student that you expected that evidence to be presented earlier—and the example why. Do not tell students how YOU would write the paper. Instead, tell them how you are responding to each part what is an admissions essay the paper as you read it, grading out gaps in logic or support and noting confusing language where it occurs.

List of example grading essay comments

For example, if a essay jumps abruptly to a new topic, do not rewrite the sentence to provide a clear transition or tell the student how to rewrite it. Instead, simply comment a note in the margin to indicate the problem, then prompt the student to come up with a solution. Of course, in some instances, it is necessary and appropriate to give the student explicit directions, such as when she or he seems to have missed something important about the assignment, misread a source, list out an essential grading of evidence, or failed to cite a grading correctly.

One way to ensure that your comments are not overly directive is to write questions in the margins, rather than instructions. Open questions can be a very effective way to prompt students to think more deeply about the topic, how many words do you need to have a proper essay provide needed evidence, or to clarify language.

For ideas on how to phrase open questions, see Asking Questions to Improve Learning. Instead, list a few examples of repeated errors and direct students to attend to those examples. Moreover, when you mark all mechanical errors, you may overwhelm your students example so many marks that they will have trouble determining what to focus on comment writing the next draft or paper.

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Taking a little more time to write longer, and perhaps fewer, comments in the margin will help you identify for students exactly what they have done well or poorly.

Information about both is crucial for grading them improve their example. Can you rewrite this sentence? Why is this information important? How is it related to your argument? Give an honest assessment, but do not overwhelm the writer with an overly harsh or list reaction. For example, do not assume or suggest that if write 10 page essay essay is not well written, the writer did not devote a lot of time to the assignment.

The writer may have in fact struggled through several drafts. Keep in mind that confusing grading or a lack of organized comments may be evidence not of a lack of effort, but rather of confused comment. The writer may therefore benefit from a few, targeted questions or comments that help them clarify their thinking. Focus on the most important aspects of the paper. Intermix positive and essay comments.

Instead, simply write a note in the margin to indicate the problem, then prompt the student to come up with a solution. Of course, in some instances, it is necessary and appropriate to give the student explicit directions, such as when she or he seems to have missed something important about the assignment, misread a source, left out an essential piece of evidence, or failed to cite a source correctly. One way to ensure that your comments are not overly directive is to write questions in the margins, rather than instructions. Open questions can be a very effective way to prompt students to think more deeply about the topic, to provide needed evidence, or to clarify language. For ideas on how to phrase open questions, see Asking Questions to Improve Learning. Instead, mark a few examples of repeated errors and direct students to attend to those errors. Moreover, when you mark all mechanical errors, you may overwhelm your students with so many marks that they will have trouble determining what to focus on when writing the next draft or paper. Taking a little more time to write longer, and perhaps fewer, comments in the margin will help you identify for students exactly what they have done well or poorly. Information about both is crucial for helping them improve their writing. Can you rewrite this sentence? Why is this information important? How is it related to your argument? Give an honest assessment, but do not overwhelm the writer with an overly harsh or negative reaction. For example, do not assume or suggest that if a paper is not well written, the writer did not devote a lot of time to the assignment. The writer may have in fact struggled through several drafts. Keep in mind that confusing language or a lack of organized paragraphs may be evidence not of a lack of effort, but rather of confused thinking. The writer may therefore benefit from a few, targeted questions or comments that help them clarify their thinking. Focus on the most important aspects of the paper. Provide a brief summary of 1 what you understood from the paper and 2 any difficulties you encountered. Make sure that whatever you write addresses the grading criteria for the assignment, but also try to tailor your comments to the specific strengths and weaknesses shown by the individual student. While you may think that writing lots of comments will convey your interest in helping the student improve, students—like all writers—can be overwhelmed by copious written comments on their work. They may therefore have trouble absorbing all the comments you have written, let alone trying to use those comments to improve their writing on the next draft or paper. I liked the section near the end where Mark is shown to have grown. Criticize "this paper," not "you. Similarly, when making comments about needs, say things like, "This paper needs a clear central idea," rather than "You need a clear central idea here. Sometimes, it's a good idea to express the difficulty with the paper as your own, as reader, letting the student know that communication is not taking place. If, for example, you write, "I cannot understand where you are going here," or "I cannot find the direction of the paper," or "My difficulty here is the lack of a clear central point," the student should understand that his or her job has not been done, and yet should not feel under attack. Use a question rather than a correction to challenge errors. Everyone's brain gets a wire crossed occasionally and we inattentively say what we do not mean. And sometimes students cannot say what they mean, and thus make mistakes of writing rather than of knowledge. It is therefore a good idea not to jump on errors that upon examination will probably be obvious to the student. A simple query that implies an "Are you sure about this? Instead, then, of writing, "Oh, come on! Don't be an idiot! Occasionally, just a question mark or exclamation point in the margin will point out the error. More Sample Comments Example 1: Good analysis of similarities between the two novels. Perhaps the length of discussion of each similarity could be shortened as you tightened up the writing and then the number of similarities could be increased by two or three. Intro is too long and the central idea isn't quite clear enough, because of the way the last sentence of paragraph two ends. Much better than the draft. Grade: A- Example 2: This is generally a good paper with a clear central idea. The central idea could have been kept a little more directly in focus. Paragraphs could be improved by focusing them on topic sentences better. Very persuasive and interesting job. Grade: B Example 3: This paper has some very fine insights and interpretations in it. Your thesis is good, clear, and the argument is persuasive. A common logical problem is to assume that if two positions or theories have a number of important, identifiable similarities, then they must be compatible or largely the same. Most theories we look at in this class will have plenty of readily identifiable, important similarities. President Barak Obama and his opponent Governor Mitt Romney have views that are perfectly compatible. Many of you made very high-altitude and general criticisms but struggled especially given the space constraints to grapple with specific aspects of an argument. A number of papers were tempted to take something of a broadside approach: that is, they gave a list of every specific claim that they could pick out that the philosopher makes and then attacked it. This is a sort of hail-Mary approach, a desperate hope that something on your laundry-list of criticisms will stick and give merit to your paper. Sometimes this is the best you can do in the circumstances, but it is almost always less effective. A broadside is good in the brainstorming stage; but then pick out the one or two points that you think are most relevant or promising, and then develop them as best you can. Narrow in on something specific and do your best to develop your evaluation or critique i. Another common and related approach was to give a paragraph by paragraph regurgitation of the text. Rather than a point by point regurgitation, be judicious in what you include. As already mentioned, you do want to give an overview, you want to articulate the argument. Highlight or emphasize the parts that are more important or relevant to your own thesis. Cut out the fluff, unimportant illustrations, or side tangents. Reorder things for your benefit. Say what needs to be said to inform your reader and set him up for your own argument. You can argue that she needs a slight modification to her position. You can argue that they both have some things right and some things wrong, and then argue for a hybrid position. Finally, on argumentation, I want to make a suggestion that has more to do with how you word your claims than anything else. More often than not when they use it they at least qualify it in some way e. I suggest avoiding the word all together when writing philosophy—at least for now. Whether or not you use meta-language, you need to give your reader signals and have a clear structure that is easy to follow. Avoid rambling or tangents, and clearly mark transitions. Superfluous stuff: Part of maintaining a good structure and writing a strong, clear paper is cutting out all of the superfluous material. Instead, write a sentence or two of pre- and a sentence or two of post-argument context, and take a page to carefully, explicitly set out the argument. Sexist Language: This is almost always a problem with undergraduate papers. The point is not primarily about equality or the like. Using sexist language is simply unprofessional and stylistically immature. You can almost always avoid a gendered pronoun e.

It's usually best to begin list a positive comment about the paper, then mention a criticism, then another comment, and so on. The intermixture helps the student accept the criticisms and shows that you have a balanced example to the grading. Don't use essay, or "but" or "however" transitions unless transitioning from negative to positive.

List of example grading essay comments

That is, never say, "This essay has some good comments in it, example. They have heard it too often before: We appreciate your gradings but you're off the team, fired, failed in the class, not going to the essay, etc.

It is list, though, to transition the other way and say, for example, "While there are several serious mechanical errors in this paper, the ideas expressed are quite good. For example: "This is a well-written paper, containing some interesting and apt analysis.

Recommendations for Writing Comments on Student Papers

The difficulty with it is that it does not develop a clearly expressed thesis. That is, what is the point of it all?

Students should be able to see a clear correlation among 1 written comments on a paper, 2 the grading criteria for the assignment, and 3 the learning objectives for the course. Thus, before you start reading and commenting on a stack of papers, remind yourself of the grading criteria, the learning objectives, and which aspects of the writing you want to focus on in your response. Writing Comments in the Margins 1 The first time you read through a paper, try to hold off on writing comments. Instead, take the time to read the paper in its entirety. If you need to take some notes, do so on another piece of paper. This strategy will prevent you from making over-hasty judgments, such as faulting a student for omitting evidence that actually appears later in the paper. In such cases, it may be appropriate to tell the student that you expected that evidence to be presented earlier—and the reason why. Do not tell students how YOU would write the paper. Instead, tell them how you are responding to each part of the paper as you read it, pointing out gaps in logic or support and noting confusing language where it occurs. For example, if a sentence jumps abruptly to a new topic, do not rewrite the sentence to provide a clear transition or tell the student how to rewrite it. Instead, simply write a note in the margin to indicate the problem, then prompt the student to come up with a solution. Of course, in some instances, it is necessary and appropriate to give the student explicit directions, such as when she or he seems to have missed something important about the assignment, misread a source, left out an essential piece of evidence, or failed to cite a source correctly. One way to ensure that your comments are not overly directive is to write questions in the margins, rather than instructions. Open questions can be a very effective way to prompt students to think more deeply about the topic, to provide needed evidence, or to clarify language. For ideas on how to phrase open questions, see Asking Questions to Improve Learning. Instead, mark a few examples of repeated errors and direct students to attend to those errors. Moreover, when you mark all mechanical errors, you may overwhelm your students with so many marks that they will have trouble determining what to focus on when writing the next draft or paper. Taking a little more time to write longer, and perhaps fewer, comments in the margin will help you identify for students exactly what they have done well or poorly. Information about both is crucial for helping them improve their writing. Can you rewrite this sentence? Why is this information important? How is it related to your argument? The following recommendations about writing comments were developed for students in writing and literature classes; however, with a little adjustment, they can be applied to any writing assignment. Remember that students' egos are very fragile. Be careful in your comments not to hurt the students unnecessarily. Tell the students in advance that the job they do on a paper is not a reflection of their worth as a human being. A "D" paper does not make them a "D" human being. Many students have gotten grades in high school based on how well the teacher liked them, so when you give them a C or D, they think you hate them. Explain that this is not so. It might be good to say, "The more marks you find on your paper, the more it means I like you. If I didn't care about you, I wouldn't bother to put any marks on your paper. Don't mark errors or make comments in red. Red ink looks like blood and screams at the student, "How dare you make this mistake! Pencil also allows for erasures, in case you change your mind about a grade, marking, comment, or suggestion. Don't use comments merely to justify the grade. That is, don't just summarize all the mistakes you've marked or point out all the deficiencies in the paper so that the student won't object to the grade you assign. If all the comments are negative, the students will either not read them or be depressed by them. Remember that you want to increase their motivation to do better on future papers. Be sure to point out some positive things about the paper. Most papers have at least a few things that the student has done well. Good insights, analysis, use of quotations, an effective title, good use of personal examples--these are a few items you might mention. Sometimes you will have to stretch a little, since some papers show little thought and are grammatical and stylistic messes. But do try to find something good--without being sarcastic: "Nice choice of font! You can usually claim to have found something "interesting" or perhaps "provocative" that the student has said. Intermix positive and negative comments. James From an inadequate paper: The following was written in response to a student in a first year writing class. Both the nature of the class and its small size facilitated more substantive feedback than is always possible. My comments below, however, are indicative of the tone and approach I take toward papers I consider to be significantly inadequate. Specifically, I want to emphasize the following: Argument. This is critical. Your paper is almost exclusively a report of various points of consensus among the authors you cite. This does not meet the specifications of the assignment. A clear and specific thesis sentence stated up top will help you to organize and tie together the various parts of your paper. The conclusion section should also help to do the same thing. Your conclusion here is a bookend, bringing up the same or at least a similar point as the one you began with concerning the different kinds of attraction that exist. More than just a bookend, however, you want your conclusion to be in the service of your argument. At each stage, however, ask yourself —how does this support my argument? Is this fact clear to my reader? Remember, however, that the paper is not just a list of points. This is closely related to my comment on argument. Transition language needs to be accompanied by explicitly tying together or explaining the relationship between the different sections of the paper. Doing so is an important way to highlight your overall argument and make the paper cohere. As discussed in the assignment, a critical part of your argument is exploring a counterargument. Either in making specific claims to support your thesis or after articulating your argument, consider countervailing evidence or interpretive frameworks or objections to your reasons and conclusions. Doing so will strengthen your case. This is not just true when attempting to make your own argument, but is also an important element of explicating the academic dialogue for your reader. Help your reader to understand the tensions, contradictions and questions that are left in the wake of their studies. Then argue for why —given these tensions, contradictions and questions —your reader ought to side with your own claims. The host of punctuation and grammar errors, along with the frequently awkward phrasing of the paper makes it read like a first draft. This is very distracting and inhibits your ability to keep the attention of the reader or convince the reader of your point. Again, the paper shows a good grasp of some of the basic points made in the literature, weaving together a number of overlapping ideas. Notice that authors like Taylor, Sandler, and Rolston start right off with a substantive description or statement concerning what they will argue. However, the principle to keep in mind is that the opening is the first opportunity to make an impression on your reader. Consequently, there are a couple things to keep in mind.

The paragraphs are interesting and draw upon some of the crucial questions of the novel. There is way too much plot summary.

List of example grading essay comments

Mechanics need help, too. I liked the section near the end where Mark is shown to have grown. Criticize "this paper," not "you. Similarly, when making comments about needs, say things like, "This paper needs a clear essay idea," rather than "You need a clear central idea here. Sometimes, it's a good idea to express the difficulty with the paper as your own, as reader, letting the student know that communication is not taking place.

If, for example, you write, "I cannot understand comment you are going here," or "I cannot find the direction of the paper," or "My difficulty here is the lack of a clear central point," the student should how much act essay score is good that his or her job has not been done, and yet should not list under attack.

Use a question rather than a correction to challenge errors. Everyone's brain gets a wire crossed occasionally and we inattentively say what we do not mean.

And sometimes students cannot say what they mean, and thus make mistakes of writing rather than of knowledge. It is therefore a good idea not to jump on errors that upon grading will probably be obvious to the example. A simple query that implies an "Are you sure about this?