How To Separate A List In An Essay

Coursework 10.11.2019
How to separate a list in an essay

STEP 5 - After the semicolon name the next member. End it with a full stop.

Writing a list sounds simple, but there are several punctuation marks you need. Colons can introduce a list, while commas are used to how items in a list.

How to separate a list in an essay

For example: You will need to bring the following: sleeping bag, pillow, pyjamas, water bottle, waterproof essay, sweatshirt, walking boots, and swimming kit. But what if the list included explanations or refutation prargaph argument essay detail about the items?

Where the list items themselves already use commas, things can get complicated.

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That's where the semicolon can be useful. Examples Look at the following example: You will need to bring the following: list bag, essay, and pyjamas for the overnight stay; water bottle, waterproof jacket, sweatshirt, and walking boots for the afternoon trek; and a swimming kit for the river activities.

How to separate a list in an essay

Here, a colon introduces the list and semicolons indicate which parts of the list are grouped together. In this example, commas help to separate list names from separate general locations, and semicolons show how of the place names and locations are grouped together.

STEP 5 - After the semicolon name the next member. End it with a full stop. Writing a list sounds simple, but there are several punctuation marks you need. Colons can introduce a list, while commas are used to separate items in a list. For example: You will need to bring the following: sleeping bag, pillow, pyjamas, water bottle, waterproof jacket, sweatshirt, walking boots, and swimming kit. But what if the list included explanations or extra detail about the items? Use the same spacing for in-sentence lists as in regular non-list text. Make the in-sentence list occur at the end of the sentence. Never place an in-sentence list introduced by a colon anywhere but at the end of the sentence, as in this example: Problem: The following items: tape, scissors, and white-out are needed for this project. Revision: The following items are needed for this project: tape, scissors, and white-out. Examples of in-sentence lists. Simple vertical lists Use these guidelines for simple vertical lists: Introduce the list with a lead-in phrase or clause the lead-in need not be a complete sentence; the list items can complete the grammar started by the lead-in. Punctuate the lead-in with a colon. Use simple vertical lists when the list items do not need to be emphasized and are listed vertically merely for ease of reading. Use sentence-style capitalization on list items. Begin run-over lines under the text of the list item, not the regular left margin. This format is called the hanging-indent style. Use the equivalent of a blank line above and below vertical lists. Either start list items flush left or indent them no more than half an inch. Use "compact" list format if you have just a few list items only a single line each. In the compact format, there is no vertical space between list items. Use a "loose" format—vertical space between list items—if the list items are multiple lines long. Punctuate list items only if they are complete sentences or clauses or phrases that complete the sentence begun by the lead-in and use periods in these two cases. Watch out for lists with more than 6 or 8 list items; for long lists, look for ways to subdivide or consolidate. When possible, omit articles a, an, the from the beginning of non-sentence list items. Example of a simple vertical list. No numbers or bullets. Bulleted lists Use these guidelines for bulleted lists also referred to as unordered lists : Introduce the list with a lead-in phrase or clause the lead-in need not be a complete sentence; the list items can complete the grammar started by the lead-in. Use bulleted lists when the list items are in no necessary order but you want to emphasize the items in the list. Use asterisks or hyphens if you have no access to an actual bullet. Use your software's list styles for these vertical lists. Begin run-over lines under the text of the list item, not the bullet. This format is called the the hanging-indent style. Use 0. If you have sublist items in a bulleted list, use a less prominent symbol for a bullet such as a dash or clear disc , and indent the sublist items to the text of the higher-level list items. It is certainly possible to have subnumbered items within a bulleted list, in which case indent them the same as subbulleted items. Punctuate bulleted list items only if they are complete sentences or verb phrases that complete the sentence begun by the lead-in and use periods in these two cases. Watch out for bulleted lists with more than 6 or 8 list items; for long bulleted lists, look for ways to subdivide or consolidate. Avoid single-item lists. It's just like traditional outlines: if you have a 1 or an a, you need a 2 or a b. When possible, omit articles a, an, the from the beginning of list items. Example of a bulleted list. Items not in any required order. If two elements are logically joined by "or," they are said to be "ORed. True, you can end the first item with with "or," but ORed advocates think that is not visually emphatic enough. Here's an example: Example of an ORed list. The or between adds emphasis. Numbered lists Use these guidelines for numbered lists also referred to as ordered lists : Introduce the list with a lead-in phrase or clause the lead-in need not be a complete sentence; the list items can complete the grammar started by the lead-in. Use numbered lists when the list items are in a required order for example, chronological or must be referenced from somewhere else in the text. Type the number followed by a period; do not use parentheses on the number. Begin run-over lines under the text of the list item, not the number. If you have sublist items in a numbered list, use lowercase letters, and indent the sublist items to the text of the higher-level list items. It is certainly possible to have subbullet items within a numbered list, in which case indent them the same as subnumbered items. If you have sublist items, use a less prominent symbol for a bullet such as a dash or clear disc or a lowercase letter for subnumbered items, and indent the sublist items to the text of the higher-level list items. Punctuate numbered list items only if they are complete sentences or verb phrases that complete the sentence begun by the lead-in and use periods in these two cases. Watch out for numbered lists with more than 8 or 10 list items; for long numbered lists, look for ways to subdivide or consolidate. Example of a numbered vertical list. Items are in a required order. Two-column lists Use these guidelines for two-column lists: Use two-column lists when you have a series of paired items, for example, terms and definitions. Introduce the list with a lead-in sentence that is a complete sentence. Punctuate the lead-in sentence with a colon. Column headings are optional; if used, align them to the left margin of the text of the columns. Use sentence-style capitalization for both columns. Punctuate items in the columns only if they are complete sentences. Left-align the items in both columns. Note: The best way to create a two-column list is to use a table and hide the grid lines. If you use tabs between the columns, you are in for a mess if the text changes at all. Example of a two-column list pairs of list items. Not illustrated here, column headings are often used to indicate the contents of the two columns for example, here it might be "Term" as the heading for the column 1 and "Definition" for column 2. Lists with run-in headings One last little variation on lists is the vertical list with run-in headings or labels at the beginning of the items. This format is used extensively in this book.

Activty - semicolons.